All Posts (4366)

Sort by

10827476677?profile=RESIZE_584x

The Suazo Business Center has jump-started about 5,000 Utah small businesses over the past two decades, about 93% of which are minority-owned. Two women have driven that success: the center's founder, Gladys Gonzalez, and its current president and CEO, Silvia Castro.

The women, both immigrants from South America, know firsthand the challenges first-generation immigrants face when it comes to "making it" in the U.S. They've used those experiences to provide culturally relevant, multilingual business advice and mentoring to entrepreneurs across the state. READ MORE AT KSL.COM

Read more…

3 out of 4 Latinos don't feel included at work

10824855692?profile=RESIZE_584x

Only about 25% of Latinos say they feel fully included at their workplaces, according to a new report from Bain & Company, a management consulting firm. Why does it matter? Latinos accounted for around 80% of workforce growth from 2010 to 2017, the fastest growing demographic. Seventy percent of Latino workers say inclusion is a critical factor when evaluating prospective employers, the study found. READ MORE AT AXIOS

Read more…

10810468489?profile=RESIZE_584x

Seven out of 10 Americans attribute the country’s economic growth to Latino population growth, reflecting that U.S. Hispanics have the highest workforce contribution rate (65.6 percent) and have started the most small businesses out of any other population group over the last decade.

There are significant areas where misconceptions about the Latino workforce can be corrected:

• More than 75 percent of Americans believe Latino immigrants have a lot to offer this country and are an economic boost (Asian, 87 percent; Black, 85 percent; White, 76 percent).
• Many non-Latinos also believe undocumented immigrants are taking jobs Americans depend on (Asian, 55 percent; White, 53 percent; Black, 49 percent), though undocumented immigrants make up only 13 percent of all Latinos in the United States.
• The view that Latinos are farmworkers is prevalent, even among Latinos, who believe half of Latinos fit that description. A commonly held misperception is that “farmworker” describes more Latinos than “entrepreneurial or business-minded,” despite U.S. Latinos creating the most small businesses in the country over the last 10 years. READ MORE AT LOS ANGELES BUSINESS JOURNAL

Read more…

Hispanic businesses are a growing powerhouse

10809740455?profile=RESIZE_584x

Latino-owned companies are growing at record rates and have a plethora of support to tap into. However, securing funding remains a challenge. There are an estimated 4.65 million Hispanic-owned businesses in the US, making them the fastest-growing segment of small businesses in the nation. According to the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative (SLEI), a research and education collaboration between Stanford University and the Latino Business Action Network, over the last 10 years, the number of Latino-owned businesses in the US has grown 44% compared to just 4% for all others. READ MORE AT THE NEW JERSEY BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Read more…

Latinos want to see more diversity in the media

10807516671?profile=RESIZE_584x

When it comes to Latino representation in the media, Hollywood has a long way to go. That’s according to a recent survey that polled 1,000 Latinos and 1,000 non-Latinos. Although 77% feel “some” progress has been made in television than in films (67%), three in five still think there aren’t enough Latino actors and actresses on screen. In fact, three in four Latinos believe their culture is often stereotyped in the media. READ MORE AT NYDAILYNEWS

Read more…

Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

10795846662?profile=RESIZE_584x

Hispanic Heritage Month is a month-long United States holiday to celebrate the contributions, cultures, and history of people living in the U.S. with ancestors from Mexico, Spain, Central and South America, and the Caribbean Islands. Beginning in 1968, President Lyndon Johnson instituted a weeklong celebration for the Hispanic and Latin Americans in the U.S., but the holiday was later changed by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to a month-long event. Hispanic Heritage Month (HHM) runs from September 15th to October 15th. This month is full of significant historic events for much of Latin America, such as: READ MORE AT ALLTOGETHER

Read more…

Latinos economic opportunity

10784436479?profile=RESIZE_584x

More than two-thirds of young adults in the United States live close to the homes they grew up in, a new Census Bureau and Harvard University study found, with Latinos, Black people and those from low-income families who left home only moving a short distance away. Economic opportunities for Hispanic and Black young adults, as well as those from low-income families, are closer to home, because those groups are less likely to move farther away. READ MORE AT NBC NEWS

Read more…

10777566864?profile=RESIZE_584x

Latinos make solid and consistent contributions to Illinois’ population and labor force.

Were it not for Latinos, the state’s population and workforce would have contracted. The group contributed more than $97 billion to Chicago’s economy from 2010-2018, according to the recently released 2022 Chicago Metro Latino GDP Report. READ MORE AT CHICAGO REPORTER

Read more…

10765873097?profile=RESIZE_584x

Data presented in Telemundo's "Latinas Powering Forward" report indicate that the population of Latinas under the age of 40 has grown 55% in the last 20 years.

Of the 29 million Latina women in the USA, 65% are under 40 years old. These new generations have chosen to prioritize their education and professional development. READ MORE AT NEWSWIRES

Read more…

10764364052?profile=RESIZE_584x

Latinos are more likely to subscribe to multiple streaming services than the average American, according to a recent report but Latinos are rarely depicted on screen despite being avid TV consumers and outspending other racial and ethnic groups in movie ticket purchases. Two recent cancellations illustrate how the television and film industry fails Latino-led productions, advocates say. READ MORE AT AXIOS

Read more…

10758014868?profile=RESIZE_584x

Diverse Companies Earn 2.5 Times Higher Cash Flow Per Employee and Inclusive Teams Are More Productive by Over 35%. The global market for Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) estimated at US$9.3 Billion in the year 2022, is projected to reach a revised size of US$15.4 Billion by 2026, growing at a CAGR of 12.6% over the analysis period. READ MORE AT GLOBAL NEWSWIRE

Read more…

Hollywood’s persistent erasure of Latinos

10758004081?profile=RESIZE_584x

It wasn’t a great week for Latinos in Hollywood, but I’m sure many of you knew that already. Between Warner Bros. axing the release of “Batgirl” starring Leslie Grace, HBO Max canceling the coming-of-age comedy TV series “The Gordita Chronicles” and James Franco being cast as Cuban dictator Fidel Castro in an upcoming feature, Latinos are being mercilessly discarded and overlooked in the entertainment business. Worse yet, not many seem to care. READ MORE AT VARIETY

Read more…

10748440498?profile=RESIZE_584x

The diverse and growing Hispanic and Latino community in the United States accounts for about 18 percent of the overall population and is projected to comprise the majority of net new workers this decade. Most analysis of this community does not account for its rich diversity—largely due to data limitations or a lack of cultural understanding. READ MORE AT CENTER FOR AMERICAN PROGRESS

Read more…

10739060277?profile=RESIZE_584x

Women of all races who worked full time, year-round in 2020 were paid on average just 83 cents for every dollar paid to men, according to a National Women's Law Center report released ahead of Equal Pay Day on Tuesday. The symbolic day marks how far into the year most women must work to earn what men were paid in the previous year.

“It seems like it’s just a few pennies on the dollar, but it adds up,” Jasmine Tucker, the report’s author, told NBC News. “But Latinas in particular face some of the largest wage gaps.” Latinas only earn 57 cents for every dollar paid to a non-Hispanic man — meaning they have to work at least 21 months, nearly two years, to match a white man’s yearly income. READ MORE AT NBCNEWS

Read more…

15 fun Hispanic Heritage Month facts

10678871880?profile=RESIZE_584x

Hispanic Heritage Month has been celebrated in the U.S. for over 30 years. Formally known as National Hispanic Heritage Month, the annual event honors Hispanic cultures and traditions originating from 20 countries and one territory. Both the Hispanic and Latinx communities observe Hispanic Heritage Month because of their shared Spanish language.

If you’re ready to dive deep into fun Hispanic Heritage Month facts, keep on reading. READ MORE AT GOOD HOUSE KEEPING

Read more…

10639181096?profile=RESIZE_584x

For all businesses, but particularly smaller teams and start-ups, networking is essential to building relationships and gaining opportunities to grow the business. These opportunities are more than just referrals for new customers. Networking is a popular way to share ideas and collaborate with fellow business owners. But, networking is a true art form and there are definitely some ‘do’s and don’ts’ to consider for it to be successful. Here are some tips to help you on your way to becoming a networking pro. READ MORE AT FINANCE MONTHLY

Read more…

10630433658?profile=RESIZE_584x

More than 40% of Fortune 500 companies operating in 2010 were founded by immigrants or their children, according to the Partnership for a New American Economy — including some of the most well-known brands, from Apple and IBM to Disney and McDonald's. The companies noted had combined revenues of $4.2 trillion — more than the GDP of most countries.

The ability to embrace cultural perspectives is absolutely critical to the way we view the world. Speaking multiple languages and even using English as a secondary language is not a setback, it is your secret weapon. READ MORE AT ENTREPRENEUR

Read more…

5 facts about Latinos and education

10620357693?profile=RESIZE_584x

Educational attainment among U.S. Latinos has been changing rapidly in recent years, reflecting the group’s growth in the nation’s public K-12 schools and colleges. Over the past decade, the Hispanic high school dropout rate has declined and college enrollment has increased, even as Hispanics trail other groups in earning a bachelor’s degree.

66% of Hispanics who got a job or entered the military directly after high school cited the need to help support their family as a reason for not enrolling in college, compared with 39% of whites. READ MORE AT PEW RESEARCH CENTER

Read more…

10614704268?profile=RESIZE_584x

Many Latinos living in the U.S. suffered through acute economic upheaval in their countries of origin. Our troubled experiences influence our financial behavior and our economic outlook. It’s like we have financial PTSD.

Our instinctive reaction is to save money in places that feel safe — under the mattress or, at best, in a checking or savings account — rather than investing it to build wealth. Far too many Latinos grew up with parents who did this because they had no trust in banks.

We know firsthand how life-altering experiences can lead to financial trauma. READ MORE AT THE LOS ANGELES TIMES

Read more…

© COPYRIGHT 1995 - 2020. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED