Education (174)

How Hispanics influence South Florida

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Florida is one of the many states in the U.S. whose name is Spanish in origin. “La Florida” which can be translated to mean “the flowering” references the beautiful flowers that grow and blossom here. Florida’s name is not the only mark that Hispanic people have left on the state, especially South Florida.

Although the arrival of Spanish-speaking people came long before the 1930s, most Hispanic contributions can be traced to large immigration groups of Cubans, Venezuelans and Nicaraguans. READ MORE AT THE CURRENT

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After losing 66 percent of their household wealth in the Great Recession, Latino homeowners could now be poised to lead the country's economic recovery.

Latinos have increased their homeownership rate for six consecutive years, according to a 2020 report from the National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals. READ MORE AT NBC NEWS

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The new Latino landscape

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Hispanics accounted for over half of the nation’s population growth in the last decade. This is not just reflected in larger cities, but in mountain towns, Southern neighborhoods and Midwestern prairies.

“The Latino population has been dispersing across the United States for years — a reflection of where the nation’s population is moving and where opportunities are located,” said Mark Hugo Lopez, director of race and ethnicity research at the Pew Research Center. READ MORE AT NBC NEWS

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City Colleges of Chicago-Harold Washington College's president, Dr. Daniel Lopez PhD will be one of five alumni inducted into the College of Education at Illinois State University Illinois State's Hall of Fame on Friday, October 15.

Dr. Lopez has over twenty-five years of experience in higher education. As a leader, he has provided comprehensive academic support services to students, developed educational programming, and has led many student affairs units. He has created safe spaces for undocumented students and been a role model for many students of color. He is a member of the Latino Alumni Network at Illinois State, the Illinois Latino Council on Higher Education, the Diversifying Faculty in Illinois graduate fellowship, and the Latin United Housing Association. READ MORE

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8 Latinos who influenced American life

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Hispanic Latinos are the fastest growing population in the United States accounting for roughly 18% — 60.6 million — of the nation's total population. Latinos continue to contribute to American culture as musicians, small business owners, chefs, veterans and many other professions.

Hispanic Heritage Month, which runs from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, honors the contributions that Hispanic and Latino Americans have made to U.S. society and the fabric of its culture. READ MORE AT NBC WASHINGTON

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Making the outdoors safe for people of color

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Outdoor enthusiasts want people of color to embrace activities like hiking, biking, kayaking, camping and birding — and feel safe while enjoying it all.

Why it matters: A national reckoning has drawn attention to the discrimination some people of color face during a run in the mountains or a walk on a trail. The outdoors can be deadly due to bigotry, not just wildlife, lurking in the woods. READ MORE AT AXIOS

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Why Latino students avoid college loans

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San Antonio’s Black and Latino college students are significantly more likely to avoid taking out student loans because they’re afraid they won’t be able to pay them back.

In a survey Texas Public Radio sent to students currently or recently enrolled in one of San Antonio’s public institutions of higher education, Hispanic students were just as likely as white students to take out loans. But the reasons they didn’t take out loans varied depending on their race and ethnicity. READ MORE AT TEXAS PUBLIC RADIO

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The numbers speak for themselves. Latinas have to work for nearly two years to make what white men make in a year, earning only $0.55 to every dollar a white man earns. Black women make $0.62 per $1 made by a white man, and Native American women make $0.57.

The pay disparity that Latinas face has barely improved over the last 30 years. But these Latina money experts are done waiting. READ MORE AT NEXT ADVISOR

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Many Latino men haven’t gotten vaccinated

 

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Nationally, a third of unvaccinated Latinos say they want to get the shot as soon as possible — a much higher share than unvaccinated Black or white people, according to a survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

But many are concerned about missing work because of side effects, have transportation difficulties or mistakenly believe they might have to pay for the vaccine, the Kaiser survey showed. READ MORE AT LOS ANGELES TIMES

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Even without the kind of spending on Latino turnout that some had hoped to see, they registered and voted in record numbers in the 2020 presidential election, according to a City University of New York study.

The election saw a dramatic rise in registration and voting by some 18.7 million Latinos, so that about 1 in 10 voters was Latino.. READ MORE AT NBC NEWS

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A year away from another election cycle, a nationwide poll of Hispanic Americans shows their opinions, interests and preferences don’t align perfectly with either of the country’s two major political parties.

When asked what topics matter most to them, 29% said COVID-19 is the most pressing issue facing the nation. After the pandemic, 19% think the most important issue is jobs and the economy, followed by health care. Only 6% said immigration, race relations and education are the most pressing issue. READ MORE AT THE CENTER SQUARE

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Latino and Black workers remain underrepresented in the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) workforce compared with their share of all workers. But a Pew Research Center report published Thursday found that the gap in STEM workforce representation is especially large for Hispanic adults. READ MORE AT NBC NEWS

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With positive coronavirus cases rising in the city even as vaccine doses become more readily available, some residents have questions.

On Wednesday, a virtual event designed for the Latino community will be held to address questions regarding the novel coronavirus and the vaccines for it. The Illinois Department of Public Health has partnered with community entities such as Rock Valley College to create a safe space for people to ask their questions.

The hourlong event will include panelists Juana Ballesteros, manager of community public health outreach for the Illinois Department of Public Health, and Dr. Mellisa Simon of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. READ MORE AT ROCKFORD REGISTER STAR

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In the nation’s capital, three Latinas in lab coats are on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic.

Monica Mann, 34; Elizabeth Zelaya, 36; and Connie Maza, 33, analyze Covid-19 samples every day to track the spread of the virus and, more recently, to identify mutations. The three scientists and medical technologists are part of a small team in the Washington, D.C., Department of Forensic Sciences' Public Health Laboratory Division. READ MORE AT NBC NEWS

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The U.S. Hispanic population is diverse. These nearly 60 million individuals trace their heritage to Spanish-speaking countries in Latin America and to Spain, each with distinct demographic and economic profiles. But as migration patterns from Latin America change, the origins of U.S. Hispanics are beginning to shift.

Here are key facts about how the U.S. Hispanic origin groups are changing and how they differ from one another. READ MORE AT PEW RESEARCH CENTER

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Hispanic adults in the United States have higher life expectancy compared to non-Hispanic whites and non-Hispanic blacks, two groups for which a trend of decreasing death rates has plateaued.

That's according to data released Tuesday by the National Center for Health Statistics in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. READ MORE DESERET NEWS

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Making traditional Hispanic food healthier

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The leading causes of death among Latinos include heart disease and cancer, and Latinos are 50 percent more likely to die from diabetes than whites.

Hispanics also have high rates of obesity (an estimated 47 percent) and diabetes (12.1 percent) in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

While research on the causes of these conditions continues, one thing is clear: Smarter lifestyle choices, beginning with diet, are an important step to living longer and healthier. READ MORE AT USA TODAY

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