Latinas (27)

12664175894?profile=RESIZE_584x

While the gender pay gap persists for all women relative to their white male counterparts, it has long been widest for Latinas, who are paid 46% less than white men and 26% less than white women. One explanation offered for this gap has been that Latinas are more likely to hold low-wage jobs—but research indicates that those pay disparities remain in place among women who are more educated or work in more lucrative industries. READ MORE AT FAST COMPANY

Read more…

12397724684?profile=RESIZE_584x

From Women's History Month to global International Women's Day celebrations, March is a time to champion the power of women's voices and drive positive change. As you make your plans to celebrate International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month, here are four ways to access inspiring content from the past and even find new voices. READ MORE AT GOOGLE VOICES

Read more…

11021909264?profile=RESIZE_584x

Griselda Aldrete’s career path has been a journey. A native of Milwaukee, she has never shied away from opportunities and challenges in the things she has set out to do. She has plied her considerable talent in the non-profit, government, corporate and now legal realms. She served as President and CEO of Hispanic Professionals of Greater Milwaukee (HPGM) for eight years where she grew the organization’s footprint, budget and brand. She then led the City of Milwaukee’s Fire and Police Commission (FPC) as its first Hispanic executive director in the midst of a global pandemic and national civil unrest following the murder of George Floyd. A corporate engagement followed Aldrete’s government service to the citizens of Milwaukee when she joined Alliant Energy in Madison as director of stakeholder engagement. Her journey continues to add intriguing stops considering her most recent announcement as partner at the law firm of Hansen Reynolds LLC. READ MORE AT BLUEPRINT365

Read more…

10943577258?profile=RESIZE_584x

For so many years when filling out forms that asked about race or ethnicity, AMA member Theresa Rohr-Kirchgraber, MD always checked the “other” box because she never wanted to make it seem as though one side of her heritage was more important than the other. Her father is German American and her mother is Mexican American. It took her several more years to understand what those boxes really meant. READ MORE AT THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

Read more…

10909209881?profile=RESIZE_584x

The market for luxury brands is rapidly changing with a boom in the Hispanic consumer market, the fastest-growing demographic of households with incomes of $150k+, according to two new studies.

The rapidly rising affluence of Hispanics, their greater representation compared to other ethnicities in the top two quintiles, and the fact they are the fastest growing ethnicity bar none means they are an increasingly important demographic for brands to understand. READ MORE AT FORBES

Read more…

10901712256?profile=RESIZE_584x

A new study finds Latina workers earn just over half what their white, male counterparts do. The study from the National Women's Law Center found that in 2021, Latinas working full time earned just 57 cents for every dollar paid to white, non-Hispanic men.

The study provides a breakdown by community of national origin. It finds that Spanish and Argentinian women earned the most on average at 82 cents for every dollar earned by white, non-Hispanic men. Honduran women earned the least at just 44 cents on the dollar. READ MORE AT HOUSTON PUBLIC MEDIA

Read more…

10890291060?profile=RESIZE_584x

Hispanic enrollment at postsecondary institutions in the United States has seen an exponential increase over the last few decades, rising from 1.5 million in 2000 to a new high of 3.8 million in 2019 – partly reflecting the group’s rapid growth as a share of the overall U.S. population. 

The decline for Hispanics, and other racial and ethnic groups, in 2020 was driven by a drop in enrollment at two-year institutions. Hispanic enrollment at two-year colleges declined by about 230,000, or 15%, from 2019 to 2020. READ MORE AT PEW RESEARCH CENTER

Read more…

The economic state of Latinos in the U.S.

10884324658?profile=RESIZE_584x

Latinos account for the fastest-growing portion of US GDP. So much so, that if we considered US Latinos as their own country, it would be third only to the GDP growth rate of China and India in the past decade.1 At a time of economic uncertainty with concerns about a possible recession growing, consumers are looking for additional support.

Latinos are conscious of their impact, choosing brands that value the environment and their employees, all of which makes them more influential than their income levels would suggest. READ MORE AT MCKINSEY.COM

Read more…

10855633501?profile=RESIZE_584x

Even before Claire Risoli decided to open up her own restaurant, she knew she would call it Pocha. “Pocha was something that I was called growing up that I hated,” she said. “It means Americanized Mexican girl, and for me, it always made me feel like I wasn’t enough.”

Latinos like Risoli account for 52% of all new employer businesses, according to the 2022 Latino Donor Collaborative U.S. Latino GDP report. The study also measured U.S. Latinos’ contributions to the economy known as the gross domestic product and found that it was worth $2.8 trillion in 2020. READ MORE AT SPECTRUM NEWS 1

Read more…

The complexities of Latino identity

10840032060?profile=RESIZE_584x

For decades, Latinos living in the United States have sought ways to identify themselves that encompassed their pan-ethnic community. Although culturally diverse, Hispanics rallied in the 1960s for a unifying term that would grant them census representation and governmental support in education and health care, said Catherine S. Ramírez, chair of the Latin American and Latino Studies program at the University of California at Santa Cruz. However, that effort has also led to discrimination, as Hispanics and Latinos were othered and lumped together with negative stereotypes. READ MORE AT THE WASHINGTON POST

Read more…

10827476677?profile=RESIZE_584x

The Suazo Business Center has jump-started about 5,000 Utah small businesses over the past two decades, about 93% of which are minority-owned. Two women have driven that success: the center's founder, Gladys Gonzalez, and its current president and CEO, Silvia Castro.

The women, both immigrants from South America, know firsthand the challenges first-generation immigrants face when it comes to "making it" in the U.S. They've used those experiences to provide culturally relevant, multilingual business advice and mentoring to entrepreneurs across the state. READ MORE AT KSL.COM

Read more…

10765873097?profile=RESIZE_584x

Data presented in Telemundo's "Latinas Powering Forward" report indicate that the population of Latinas under the age of 40 has grown 55% in the last 20 years.

Of the 29 million Latina women in the USA, 65% are under 40 years old. These new generations have chosen to prioritize their education and professional development. READ MORE AT NEWSWIRES

Read more…

10739060277?profile=RESIZE_584x

Women of all races who worked full time, year-round in 2020 were paid on average just 83 cents for every dollar paid to men, according to a National Women's Law Center report released ahead of Equal Pay Day on Tuesday. The symbolic day marks how far into the year most women must work to earn what men were paid in the previous year.

“It seems like it’s just a few pennies on the dollar, but it adds up,” Jasmine Tucker, the report’s author, told NBC News. “But Latinas in particular face some of the largest wage gaps.” Latinas only earn 57 cents for every dollar paid to a non-Hispanic man — meaning they have to work at least 21 months, nearly two years, to match a white man’s yearly income. READ MORE AT NBCNEWS

Read more…

10614704268?profile=RESIZE_584x

Many Latinos living in the U.S. suffered through acute economic upheaval in their countries of origin. Our troubled experiences influence our financial behavior and our economic outlook. It’s like we have financial PTSD.

Our instinctive reaction is to save money in places that feel safe — under the mattress or, at best, in a checking or savings account — rather than investing it to build wealth. Far too many Latinos grew up with parents who did this because they had no trust in banks.

We know firsthand how life-altering experiences can lead to financial trauma. READ MORE AT THE LOS ANGELES TIMES

Read more…

10361176070?profile=RESIZE_584x

Jefa-Owned (owned by a Latina Boss), a national visibility campaign under PepsiCo's Juntos Crecemos platform, calls upon Latinas in the food and beverage sector to apply for the Juntos Crecemos Hispanic Digital & Delivery Program, an eight-week personalized business building program.

To mark the launch, PepsiCo leaders joined Latina business owners for the Nasdaq Opening Bell Ceremony, where they unveiled the first-ever Jefa-Owned neon sign, designed by PepsiCo. READ MORE AT CISION

Read more…

Solving the STEM gender gap

10209077457?profile=RESIZE_584x

Women make great contributions to STEM every day, and most organizations acknowledge this. In fact, 85 percent of organizations believe that a diverse and inclusive organization is crucial to encouraging different perspectives and ideas, and powering innovation. Yet, women remain underrepresented, particularly in top executive roles, and although organizations are setting ambitious diversity strategies, they often fall short. READ MORE AT TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS

Read more…

9997600499?profile=RESIZE_710x

According to a report by UCLA’s Latino Policy & Politics Initiative, Latinas are leaving the workforce at higher rates than any other demographic.

For some Latinas, the mirage of the American Dream faded amid the Covid-19 pandemic, and many chose to divest from the cultural, societal, and professional standards placed on first- and second-generation communities. READ MORE AT REFINERY 29

Read more…

9384606274?profile=RESIZE_584x

The numbers speak for themselves. Latinas have to work for nearly two years to make what white men make in a year, earning only $0.55 to every dollar a white man earns. Black women make $0.62 per $1 made by a white man, and Native American women make $0.57.

The pay disparity that Latinas face has barely improved over the last 30 years. But these Latina money experts are done waiting. READ MORE AT NEXT ADVISOR

Read more…

© COPYRIGHT 1995 - 2020. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED