business (285)

Hollywood closes the door to Latinos

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Despite being the largest minority group in the United States, 19% of the population, Latinos are underrepresented in both the media and film and television productions. According to a study by the Annenberg Inclusion Initiative at the University of California, the data has not improved in the last 16 years. In nearly two decades, only 75 actors in lead or co-lead roles were Latino, which means that the representation of actors of Latino origin in Hollywood is only 4.4%. READ MORE AT EL PAIS

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Latino-owned businesses are a dynamic and growing portion of the U.S.; with more than 5 million firms driving $800 billion in revenue, they represent a huge opportunity for the U.S. In fact, the number of Latino-owned businesses is growing 10x faster than white-owned businesses. READ MORE AT LATINO BUSINESS ACTION NETWORK

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A discussion about Hispanic Heritage Month

 

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National Hispanic Heritage Month is annually celebrated from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 for recognizing the contributions and influence of Hispanic Americans to the history, culture and the achievements of the United States. As the Hispanic population continues to grow in Florida, we take a look at how state, county and local communities are working to integrate and celebrate this growing population. VIEW VIDEO DISCUSSION AT SPECTRUM NEWS 13

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Nike is honouring Latino Heritage Month with special edition sneakers.The sportswear giant is putting out its Air Max 1 ‘Familia’ on the heels of the release of its ‘Puerto Rico’ pair in June, which dropped in time for the National Puerto Rican Day Parade.

It’s Latino Heritage Month (LHM) edition is painted in vibrant colours to reflect the energy and festivity of the Latin American population. READ MORE AT THE HOMETOWN REGISTER

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Investing in stocks or opening retirement savings accounts has long been elusive for many Latinos, but social media and podcasts that offer culturally relevant financial coaching are turning that on its head. U.S. Latinos' economic power is growing, yet they are less likely than their non-Hispanic white counterparts to have savings, retirement and non-retirement investment accounts. READ MORE AT AXIOS

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Cisco Systems, the multinational tech giant based in San Jose, has no Latino on its board of directors. Ditto for Intel, the world’s largest semiconductor manufacturer, headquartered in Santa Clara, Calif.

Ditto for Tesla — which moved offices to Austin, Texas, from Palo Alto last year — and for a host of other Fortune 100 companies with millions of Latino customers, employees and suppliers. Among them: Amazon, FedEx, Albertsons, Kroger, Walgreens Boots Alliance, Exxon Mobil, Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, United Parcel Service and Berkshire Hathaway.

Latinos are the nation’s largest ethnic or racial minority — accounting for 18.9% of the population — and its fastest-growing group. READ MORE AT YAHOO FINANCE

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This month, Republicans who control the Arizona fractious Legislature came together with Democrats in a moment of unusual bipartisan accord. They passed a bill that would let Arizona’s home cooks register with the state to legally sell perishable foods like salsas and tamales.

But Katie Hobbs, the state’s new Democratic governor, vetoed the measure last week, citing concerns about the potential for food-borne illnesses, as well as rats and insects in home kitchens. Her veto set off a ferocious culinary and cultural backlash from the Capitol to kitchens across Arizona, offering a political lesson for the new governor: Do not mess with the tamale makers. READ MORE AT THE NEW YORK TIMES

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The Suazo Business Center has jump-started about 5,000 Utah small businesses over the past two decades, about 93% of which are minority-owned. Two women have driven that success: the center's founder, Gladys Gonzalez, and its current president and CEO, Silvia Castro.

The women, both immigrants from South America, know firsthand the challenges first-generation immigrants face when it comes to "making it" in the U.S. They've used those experiences to provide culturally relevant, multilingual business advice and mentoring to entrepreneurs across the state. READ MORE AT KSL.COM

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3 out of 4 Latinos don't feel included at work

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Only about 25% of Latinos say they feel fully included at their workplaces, according to a new report from Bain & Company, a management consulting firm. Why does it matter? Latinos accounted for around 80% of workforce growth from 2010 to 2017, the fastest growing demographic. Seventy percent of Latino workers say inclusion is a critical factor when evaluating prospective employers, the study found. READ MORE AT AXIOS

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Diverse Companies Earn 2.5 Times Higher Cash Flow Per Employee and Inclusive Teams Are More Productive by Over 35%. The global market for Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) estimated at US$9.3 Billion in the year 2022, is projected to reach a revised size of US$15.4 Billion by 2026, growing at a CAGR of 12.6% over the analysis period. READ MORE AT GLOBAL NEWSWIRE

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More than 40% of Fortune 500 companies operating in 2010 were founded by immigrants or their children, according to the Partnership for a New American Economy — including some of the most well-known brands, from Apple and IBM to Disney and McDonald's. The companies noted had combined revenues of $4.2 trillion — more than the GDP of most countries.

The ability to embrace cultural perspectives is absolutely critical to the way we view the world. Speaking multiple languages and even using English as a secondary language is not a setback, it is your secret weapon. READ MORE AT ENTREPRENEUR

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The resurgence of many American cities over the last 30 years came as a surprise. After a brutal mid-century, defined by deindustrialization and white flight, cities from Oakland to Boston saw their fortunes revive. Population rebounded, crime fell, business activity hummed.

The single biggest reason why some American cities rebounded beginning in the 1990s was because of immigration. In areas like Northeast Philadelphia and East Boston, as domestic white Americans continued to leave the city, foreign-born arrivals moved in and kept the streets vibrant. READ MORE AT GOVERNING

 

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Latinos in the U.S. and Latin Americans are more likely than others to reconsider the workplace after the pandemic, Marina writes. Two-thirds of Latinos polled in Microsoft’s  say they are now much more conscious about prioritizing health over their work when it comes to going to the office, and 60% say they are considering changing jobs in response. READ MORE AT AXIOS

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Entrepreneurs protect the economy

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Economies across the globe face a double-headed threat: record levels of unemployment and towering public debt. Over the past two years, many western governments' response to one has come at the cost of the other; furlough schemes and stimulus cheques have left government balance sheets looking worryingly red.

It’s time to take a more aggressive approach. READ MORE AT THE HILL

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Top 10 US cities for entrepreneurs of color

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Just 18.7% of all businesses in the US are minority-owned, despite ethnic and racial minorities making up 40% of the population. For entrepreneurs of colour who face systemic barriers like a lack of funding, choosing the right location to start or scale a business is important. 

If you’re a startup owner of colour looking for funding, resources and support, these top 10 cities are worth relocating to, a JobSage report reveals. READ MORE AT BUSINESS CHIEF

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7 tips to boost small business sales in 2022

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Transforming ideas into reality is one of the most fulfilling things that a small business person does. However, it’s not enough to just have an idea and start a business. To succeed in the long term, you need to put in the work to make your basic brand story thrive through the equally important elements of strategy and execution. READ MORE AT BUSINESS2COMMUNITY

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Everyone wants to be an Entrepreneur

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Applications for new businesses rose 20 percent last year, after languishing for a decade. Many newly minted founders attribute it to the pandemic.

“People have become disaffected with what they’re doing, and might as well do the thing they've been wanting to do for a while,” says Stewart Thornhill, executive director of the Zell Lurie Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies at the University of Michigan. Some people who were furloughed or laid off near the start of the pandemic became entrepreneurs out of necessity. Others took stock of their good-enough jobs and decided they could do something better. READ MORE AT WIRED

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With dramatic growth in the U.S. Hispanic population, the number of Hispanic-owned businesses is growing faster than in other ethnic groups. And Latino entrepreneurs are going far beyond the sterotypical blue-collar industries like restaruants, hospitality and construction.

A January report from Stanford University concluded that Latino-owned businesses with employees are more likely than their white-owned counterparts to be technology innovators. The study found that 19% of Latino-owned firms develop and sell a tech or software product, compared to 14% of white-owned firms. READ MORE AT GBH

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