finance (32)

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Many Latinos living in the U.S. suffered through acute economic upheaval in their countries of origin. Our troubled experiences influence our financial behavior and our economic outlook. It’s like we have financial PTSD.

Our instinctive reaction is to save money in places that feel safe — under the mattress or, at best, in a checking or savings account — rather than investing it to build wealth. Far too many Latinos grew up with parents who did this because they had no trust in banks.

We know firsthand how life-altering experiences can lead to financial trauma. READ MORE AT THE LOS ANGELES TIMES

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McKinsey research reveals interventions that can help boost Latino participation in the US economy and strengthen the nation’s economic performance overall. 

Senior Partner, Lucy Pérez, how greater support for Latino workers, business owners, consumers, savers, and investors in the United States could create economic opportunities not just for individuals and families in this demographic but also for the whole country. READ MORE AT MCKINSEY RESEARCH

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Be an amigo to Latinos

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We have witnessed the tremendous buying power of Hispanics as their homeownership rates skyrocket. And yet, many Spanish-speaking customers run into roadblocks when it comes to financing. According to the National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals, Latinos experienced a 19.1% home purchase denial rate for conventional loans and were 81% more likely to be denied than their non-Latino counterparts. READ MORE AT NATIONAL MORTGAGE PROFESSIONAL

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Jefa-Owned (owned by a Latina Boss), a national visibility campaign under PepsiCo's Juntos Crecemos platform, calls upon Latinas in the food and beverage sector to apply for the Juntos Crecemos Hispanic Digital & Delivery Program, an eight-week personalized business building program.

To mark the launch, PepsiCo leaders joined Latina business owners for the Nasdaq Opening Bell Ceremony, where they unveiled the first-ever Jefa-Owned neon sign, designed by PepsiCo. READ MORE AT CISION

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A new study finds many Latino parents are hoping their children make better choices with their money than they did. Only 51 percent of Latinos would want their children to make the same financial decisions (saving, investing, and budgeting) that they did.

A recent survey of 2,000 Americans between 18 and 41, half of whom identify as Latino, found that non-Latino respondents were much more likely to want their children to learn from and model their own money habits (76% vs. 51%). READ MORE AT STUDYFINDS

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Ernst & Young LLP (EY US) today welcomes 96 Black and Latino founders and CEOs to the 2022 cohort of the EY Entrepreneurs Access Network (EAN). A national business accelerator, EAN is a comprehensive, executive program designed to elevate emerging and established Black- and Latino-owned companies through access to resources, networks and one-on-one mentoring. This marks the second full cohort of EAN participants, after the program officially launched in January 2021. READ MORE AT CISION

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Everyone wants to be an Entrepreneur

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Applications for new businesses rose 20 percent last year, after languishing for a decade. Many newly minted founders attribute it to the pandemic.

“People have become disaffected with what they’re doing, and might as well do the thing they've been wanting to do for a while,” says Stewart Thornhill, executive director of the Zell Lurie Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies at the University of Michigan. Some people who were furloughed or laid off near the start of the pandemic became entrepreneurs out of necessity. Others took stock of their good-enough jobs and decided they could do something better. READ MORE AT WIRED

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With dramatic growth in the U.S. Hispanic population, the number of Hispanic-owned businesses is growing faster than in other ethnic groups. And Latino entrepreneurs are going far beyond the sterotypical blue-collar industries like restaruants, hospitality and construction.

A January report from Stanford University concluded that Latino-owned businesses with employees are more likely than their white-owned counterparts to be technology innovators. The study found that 19% of Latino-owned firms develop and sell a tech or software product, compared to 14% of white-owned firms. READ MORE AT GBH

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While Latino-owned businesses are growing at a much faster rate than any other business segment in the country, they continue to face greater barriers to financing and report lower than average revenue per company than white-owned companies, according to new data released last week.

On Friday (January 28), the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative (SLEI) released its seventh annual research report, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, exploring the impact, challenges, and opportunities of the fastest growing business segment in the U.S. economy. READ MORE AT POETS AND QUANTS

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Hispanics increasingly entering housing market

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Projections show half of all homebuyers nationally will be Hispanic in the next decade. Latinos are the only demographic in the U.S. to increase their rate of homeownership for each of the past six years, according to the National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals. Oklahoma had the fifth-highest growth at 95.5% from 2009 to 2019, according to NAHREP. READ MORE AT THE JOURNAL RECORD

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Latinos are an economic engine for the US. They are the fastest growing minority: by 2030, 1 in 5 workers will be Latino. And they have the highest rate of entrepreneurship of any race: their businesses have grown by 12.5 percent over the past five years, compared to 5.3 percent for White-owned businesses. READ MORE AT MCKINSEY & COMPANY

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The rise of remote work during the pandemic led several Silicon Valley venture capitalists to escape California, with its wildfires and high taxes. Miami, with a large Latino population, and Atlanta, with a large Black population, have both seen higher interest.

Data from Crunchbase compiled for Reuters showed startups with a Black or Hispanic founder got 3.5% of the record $311 billion U.S. venture funding in the year to Dec. 16, up from an average 2.5% in the previous five years.

Florida and Georgia were the only states with significant deal flow that showed an increase in the number of deals for Black and Latino companies. READ MORE AT WHBL

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There have been more new businesses formed so far this year than ever. Literally ever.

According to data from the US Census Bureau analyzed by the Economic Innovation Group, there were about 1.4m new startup applications filed with the government through 30 September 2021. That’s compared with 1.14m during the same period in 2020 and 987 thousand in 2019. Every year before had been significantly less. READ MORE AT THE GUARDIAN

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Latinos are a fast-growing, young segment of the U.S. population that’s also highly entrepreneurial, yet businesses that Latinos start often struggle to get the financing they need to grow and succeed.

These businesses are among the “most overlooked opportunities for investors,” the Boston-based Bain & Co. wrote in a report released earlier this month. READ MORE AT PENTA

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Hispanic Americans have long dealt with racial discrimination and unfair lending practices, contributing to a racial wealth gap between Hispanic and white families. A survey from the Pew Research Center found that 70% of Hispanic Americans said they didn't have emergency funds to cover at least three months of expenses during the pandemic, and more than half said they worried daily or frequently about keeping up with expenses.

Those already-grueling financial circumstances have only grown worse over the past 18 months. Earlier in the pandemic, the Paycheck Protection Program provided over $521 billion in funding and over 5 million PPP loans to small businesses. However, Latino business owners didn't reap the benefits of the first round of funding. READ MORE AT INSIDER

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Latinos play a key role in economic growth as their buying power jumped to more than $1.7 trillion, according to a report from the University of Georgia. In 2020, the census pointed out a drastic national spike, with Latinos making up more than half of the population’s growth.

Their buying power is a driving force in economics ­as they reach closer to nearly $2 trillion, according to US Hispanic Market Report. READ MORE AT NBC10 NEWS

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Why Latino students avoid college loans

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San Antonio’s Black and Latino college students are significantly more likely to avoid taking out student loans because they’re afraid they won’t be able to pay them back.

In a survey Texas Public Radio sent to students currently or recently enrolled in one of San Antonio’s public institutions of higher education, Hispanic students were just as likely as white students to take out loans. But the reasons they didn’t take out loans varied depending on their race and ethnicity. READ MORE AT TEXAS PUBLIC RADIO

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