economy (133)

3 out of 4 Latinos don't feel included at work

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Only about 25% of Latinos say they feel fully included at their workplaces, according to a new report from Bain & Company, a management consulting firm. Why does it matter? Latinos accounted for around 80% of workforce growth from 2010 to 2017, the fastest growing demographic. Seventy percent of Latino workers say inclusion is a critical factor when evaluating prospective employers, the study found. READ MORE AT AXIOS

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Seven out of 10 Americans attribute the country’s economic growth to Latino population growth, reflecting that U.S. Hispanics have the highest workforce contribution rate (65.6 percent) and have started the most small businesses out of any other population group over the last decade.

There are significant areas where misconceptions about the Latino workforce can be corrected:

• More than 75 percent of Americans believe Latino immigrants have a lot to offer this country and are an economic boost (Asian, 87 percent; Black, 85 percent; White, 76 percent).
• Many non-Latinos also believe undocumented immigrants are taking jobs Americans depend on (Asian, 55 percent; White, 53 percent; Black, 49 percent), though undocumented immigrants make up only 13 percent of all Latinos in the United States.
• The view that Latinos are farmworkers is prevalent, even among Latinos, who believe half of Latinos fit that description. A commonly held misperception is that “farmworker” describes more Latinos than “entrepreneurial or business-minded,” despite U.S. Latinos creating the most small businesses in the country over the last 10 years. READ MORE AT LOS ANGELES BUSINESS JOURNAL

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Hispanic businesses are a growing powerhouse

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Latino-owned companies are growing at record rates and have a plethora of support to tap into. However, securing funding remains a challenge. There are an estimated 4.65 million Hispanic-owned businesses in the US, making them the fastest-growing segment of small businesses in the nation. According to the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative (SLEI), a research and education collaboration between Stanford University and the Latino Business Action Network, over the last 10 years, the number of Latino-owned businesses in the US has grown 44% compared to just 4% for all others. READ MORE AT THE NEW JERSEY BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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Latinos economic opportunity

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More than two-thirds of young adults in the United States live close to the homes they grew up in, a new Census Bureau and Harvard University study found, with Latinos, Black people and those from low-income families who left home only moving a short distance away. Economic opportunities for Hispanic and Black young adults, as well as those from low-income families, are closer to home, because those groups are less likely to move farther away. READ MORE AT NBC NEWS

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Latinos make solid and consistent contributions to Illinois’ population and labor force.

Were it not for Latinos, the state’s population and workforce would have contracted. The group contributed more than $97 billion to Chicago’s economy from 2010-2018, according to the recently released 2022 Chicago Metro Latino GDP Report. READ MORE AT CHICAGO REPORTER

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Data presented in Telemundo's "Latinas Powering Forward" report indicate that the population of Latinas under the age of 40 has grown 55% in the last 20 years.

Of the 29 million Latina women in the USA, 65% are under 40 years old. These new generations have chosen to prioritize their education and professional development. READ MORE AT NEWSWIRES

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The diverse and growing Hispanic and Latino community in the United States accounts for about 18 percent of the overall population and is projected to comprise the majority of net new workers this decade. Most analysis of this community does not account for its rich diversity—largely due to data limitations or a lack of cultural understanding. READ MORE AT CENTER FOR AMERICAN PROGRESS

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Women of all races who worked full time, year-round in 2020 were paid on average just 83 cents for every dollar paid to men, according to a National Women's Law Center report released ahead of Equal Pay Day on Tuesday. The symbolic day marks how far into the year most women must work to earn what men were paid in the previous year.

“It seems like it’s just a few pennies on the dollar, but it adds up,” Jasmine Tucker, the report’s author, told NBC News. “But Latinas in particular face some of the largest wage gaps.” Latinas only earn 57 cents for every dollar paid to a non-Hispanic man — meaning they have to work at least 21 months, nearly two years, to match a white man’s yearly income. READ MORE AT NBCNEWS

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The resurgence of many American cities over the last 30 years came as a surprise. After a brutal mid-century, defined by deindustrialization and white flight, cities from Oakland to Boston saw their fortunes revive. Population rebounded, crime fell, business activity hummed.

The single biggest reason why some American cities rebounded beginning in the 1990s was because of immigration. In areas like Northeast Philadelphia and East Boston, as domestic white Americans continued to leave the city, foreign-born arrivals moved in and kept the streets vibrant. READ MORE AT GOVERNING

 

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McKinsey research reveals interventions that can help boost Latino participation in the US economy and strengthen the nation’s economic performance overall. 

Senior Partner, Lucy Pérez, how greater support for Latino workers, business owners, consumers, savers, and investors in the United States could create economic opportunities not just for individuals and families in this demographic but also for the whole country. READ MORE AT MCKINSEY RESEARCH

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The Hispanic retail sector and manufacturers of products aimed at Latino consumers will benefit from the drive of intrepid Latino small business entrepreneurs in the United States. 

Even with notable disadvantages such as access to credit, Latino small business owners are the fastest-growing group of entrepreneurs in the United States. READ MORE AT ABASTO

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Although Latinos and other people of color are avid moviegoers, they are deeply underrepresented on-screen, two recent reports show. The big picture: The first year of the pandemic ravaged the movie industry, with a 72% drop in ticket sales, but research shows that Latino, Black and Asian Americans helped keep it afloat. READ MORE AT AXIOS

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Entrepreneurs protect the economy

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Economies across the globe face a double-headed threat: record levels of unemployment and towering public debt. Over the past two years, many western governments' response to one has come at the cost of the other; furlough schemes and stimulus cheques have left government balance sheets looking worryingly red.

It’s time to take a more aggressive approach. READ MORE AT THE HILL

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Top 10 US cities for entrepreneurs of color

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Just 18.7% of all businesses in the US are minority-owned, despite ethnic and racial minorities making up 40% of the population. For entrepreneurs of colour who face systemic barriers like a lack of funding, choosing the right location to start or scale a business is important. 

If you’re a startup owner of colour looking for funding, resources and support, these top 10 cities are worth relocating to, a JobSage report reveals. READ MORE AT BUSINESS CHIEF

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7 tips to boost small business sales in 2022

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Transforming ideas into reality is one of the most fulfilling things that a small business person does. However, it’s not enough to just have an idea and start a business. To succeed in the long term, you need to put in the work to make your basic brand story thrive through the equally important elements of strategy and execution. READ MORE AT BUSINESS2COMMUNITY

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Everyone wants to be an Entrepreneur

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Applications for new businesses rose 20 percent last year, after languishing for a decade. Many newly minted founders attribute it to the pandemic.

“People have become disaffected with what they’re doing, and might as well do the thing they've been wanting to do for a while,” says Stewart Thornhill, executive director of the Zell Lurie Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies at the University of Michigan. Some people who were furloughed or laid off near the start of the pandemic became entrepreneurs out of necessity. Others took stock of their good-enough jobs and decided they could do something better. READ MORE AT WIRED

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While Latino-owned businesses are growing at a much faster rate than any other business segment in the country, they continue to face greater barriers to financing and report lower than average revenue per company than white-owned companies, according to new data released last week.

On Friday (January 28), the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative (SLEI) released its seventh annual research report, State of Latino Entrepreneurship, exploring the impact, challenges, and opportunities of the fastest growing business segment in the U.S. economy. READ MORE AT POETS AND QUANTS

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